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Tips for Encouraging Your Fellow Teachers to Use Board Games in Class – 119

Episode Overview

Join Dustin for a solo episode discussing ways you can encourage your colleagues and fellow teachers to use board games. Dustin shares four tips on what you can do!

Episode Topics

  • Introduction to the Topic – 0:20
  • Tip #1 – Lead by Example – 1:46
  • Tip #2 – Host a Professional Development – 3:52
  • Tip #3 – Help your Fellow Colleagues Plan a Lesson – 7:06
  • Tip #4 – Play Some Games Outside the Classroom – 9:05

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Introduction to the Topic – 0:20

Dustin introduces the topic of today’s episode and shares upcoming episodes of Board Gaming with Education.

Lead by Example – 1:46

One of the easiest ways that led to my colleagues using games was by simply doing it myself. As an instructor at a university in Taiwan, I often used game-based learning and gamification strategies as a part of my teaching practices. I remember having a conversation with another instructor who mentioned it was great that I had found my teaching “niche.” Students came to know me as a teacher, who among other things, used games as a way to create an engaging learning environment. And with that I had students re-enroll in my classes.

The word got around among my colleagues in my department, the students at my university, and even with professors and instructors university-wide. Eventually, I was asked to give a professional development on the topic both in our department and one available to our entire university. This leads me to my next tip.

Host a Professional Development – 3:52

There are loads, loads, LOADS, of resources out there that talk about the benefits of play in the classroom, and even more specifically the benefits of using board games in the classroom. Here is a list of some resources I have come across and what a quick Google Search turned up:

Board Gaming with Education – Check out our ever-evolving resources pages on our website. These are highly recommended resources!

Ludic Language Pedagogy Journal – “An open-access, refereed journal exploring games and play in language teaching contexts.” Also, be sure to check out our interview with James York from LLP Journal.

Try These 8 Classic Board Games in Class – A quick introduction to why board games are great for the classroom and some examples.

Education (Lesson Planning Resources): Using Games in Education – A perfect overview on why games in the classroom can be excellent tools. Included in this link is how games align with Bloom’s Taxonomy.

Form and Function: Using Board Games in the Classroom – “This article will examine how the author adapted popular strategy board game Settlers of Catan by Klaus Teuber for use in large-group year 6 (11-to-12 years old) elementary school second language classes, offering learners a safe, engaging, team-centred environment in which to recall and implement previously learned communication strategies utilising simple functional language.”

Professional Development Slides: Student Perceptions of Game-Based Learning in an English Language Classroom

If this is something you have been doing for some time, I have no doubt, you can contribute meaningful professional enrichment for your fellow colleagues.

Help Fellow Colleagues Plan Their Lesson – 7:06

Ask around and see what your colleagues are working on. Obviously, you don’t want to completely derail their already laid plans and lessons, but if you have a colleague who is looking to change it up for one of their lessons, suggest a game and offer some help on planning a lesson plan around it.

In your department meetings, you can also talk about some lessons where you have used games. This goes back to my first tip, and expands on the idea of just doing it, but actually demonstrating to your colleagues how you’ve successfully implemented your game-based learning or gamification as a part of your curriculum.

Play Some Games Outside the Classroom – 9:05

This is a perfect way to get educators thinking about what games can do in the classroom. Play games during a school happy hour. You could even casually drop in a phrase like, “This would be great as a lesson, what do you think?”

You can host a family game night at your school to help introduce students and teachers to the concept of the modern board game hobby. Or host a game day for teachers as a part of a back to school or end of the year activity.

Host a board game club after school, and invite your fellow colleagues to join in on a game or two.


Transcript of “Tips for Encouraging Your Fellow Teachers to Use Board Games in Class – 119”

Board Gaming with Education 0:03
Board Gaming with Education a podcast for anyone curious about how games and education mix, we explore various topics like game based learning, gamification, and board games and the impacts they have on learning. here’s your host, Dustin Staats.

Dustin Staats 0:20
Happy New Year, and welcome to another episode of Board Gaming with Education. This is a solo episode this week, we are going to have a couple different episode formats coming up. So this week, we’re doing a solo episode, we’re talking about the tips to encourage your colleagues to use games in the classroom, we’re really kind of talking about board games here. But it can be applied to video games or computer games, if that’s something that you are interested in pursuing, or something you’re already doing in your classroom. These are some ideas that you can use to encourage your colleagues to do the same. In the next couple weeks, I’m going to be joined by Roger who is going to talk with me about are your Board Gaming with Education in 2020. And this year, so the year looking forward to 2021, and what some plans are with Board Gaming with Education. And another episode we’re gonna chat again, I’m going to chat with Roger, we’re going to talk about our five games that taught us something in 2020. So I’m excited for those two episodes. So stay tuned, those will be the next couple weeks. And then we’ll hop into season 11 of Board Gaming with Education, we’ll go back to our topical formatted episodes, which are conversations, taking a deep dive in a specific on a specific topic related to game based learning, gamification, or games for learning. So I’m excited for that. But today, again, we’re gonna go back to tips to encourage your colleagues to use games in the classroom.

So I want to start with the first one, the first one I have is a pretty simple one. And this is something maybe you are already doing. And that’s leading by example. So one of the easiest ways that lead mine colleagues to end up using games in their classroom or using game based learning activities or looking at some of the games they’re already using. And considering how they could better manage those activities, or look at how their game based learning could be more efficient in the classroom was by doing it myself. So that ended up leading to a lot of a lot of things at the university. I taught it in Taiwan. So I was an instructor there for two and a half years and often used game based learning gamification, strategies as a part of my teaching practice. I remember having a specific conversation with the teacher. And we were kind of talking about how teaching in Taiwan and what it’s like, and how to engage students and how different teachers have different teaching styles and how he had mentioned that it was really good that I found my quote, unquote, teaching niche, which was using games as a part of learning and engagement. So students came didn’t really know me as the teacher, who among other things, I hope as the teacher that used games to create an engaging learning environment, and I had students reenroll. In my classes, I had very high reviews of my my instruction in my classes each semester, which really helped to spread the word about what I was doing in the classroom and spread it to my colleagues in my department and students at the University and even university wide. So eventually, I was asked to give a professional development on the topic, both in our department and professional development available to the entire university.

So that actually leads to my next tip, which is give a professional development. There are loads and loads of resources out there that talk about the benefits of play in the classroom. And even more specifically, the benefits of using board games in the classroom. And if this is something you have been doing for some time, I have no doubt, you can contribute meaningful lead to the professional enrichment of your colleagues. So you can share some things you’re doing, you don’t necessarily have to share. This is the way you have to do it. And this is the only way you can do it, share some things that worked, share some challenges you’ve had of using games in the classroom. These are really powerful insights, I think to help teachers consider the benefits and the reasons why game based learning is such a great tool to use in your classroom as a way to engage your students and build these really strong relationships with your students too. So I mentioned there are lots of resources out there. I’ll have some links to some resources in our blog post related to this episode. So you can follow that link. In the shownotes, to go to our blog post some of the resources on clewd. I’ll mention them here, but there’ll be a few others that I won’t mention here, but one is our website Board Gaming with Education, we have a Resources tab on our website, we’re kind of updating that I feel like it’s not the most user friendly, but it’s worth checking out because there are some really great resources there. I have a couple books there, a couple other podcasts to check out some courses. And another resource that I really admire and is really awesome for English language teaching. But you can really look at some of the benefits that board games provide or game based learning provides with the ludic language pedagogy journal, and that’s an open access refereed journal, exploring games and play in language teaching contexts. But again, there’s definitely there’s definitely some overlap between how games provide engagement with language and other content areas for sure. So I also did a quick Google search. And I turned up a couple other resources that I just want to mention here. One is try these eight classic board games in the class. So it’s a quick quick introduction as to why board games are great for classrooms. And examples of how to do those are how to use them. Education, lesson planning resources, so using games and education, this is from libguides.gnso.edu, so I’ll leave the link there. But it’s a perfect overview on why games in the classroom can be excellent tools. And it also has gaming by Bloom’s taxonomy. So it looks at Bloom’s taxonomy, and how games are applied to that. So really, really practical guide in something that teachers are always kind of looking at that Bloom’s taxonomy. So you can share that and show that games do align with these things in Bloom’s taxonomy. Again, I’ll add some other links. One other thing that I mentioned here, too, is a link to my professional development slides of the one of the professional developments I gave in Taiwan, I’ll leave a link to that as well. So that’s tip number two.

Number three, is help your fellow colleagues plan their lessons. So I know, you probably have a lot on your plate as a teacher, and trying to come up with your own lessons. But if you have some time and some ability to offer some insight to your fellow colleagues, work with one of them one on one, see if you can help them come up with ideas for their lesson plans. So I mean, you don’t you don’t want to completely derail their rd laid out plans and lessons. But maybe you have a colleague who mentioned they’re looking for a way to change up one of their lessons suggested game and offer some help on planning a lesson plan around it, you could probably do a quick Google search. And maybe there’s already a lesson in place a game based learning lesson in place for that activity. And you can help your fellow colleague or your fellow teacher come up with ideas to modify that lesson plan for their learning environment or for their particular learning outcomes. In department meanings, you can also talk about some lessons where you have used games. So this goes back to my first tip and expands on that idea of just doing it but actually demonstrating to your colleagues how you’ve successfully implemented your game based learning or gamification as part of your curriculum. So by doing this, you’re able to kind of put the idea out there, hey, I’ve done this before. If you want me to help you come up with some ideas, or maybe even your, your colleague has a lesson designed for game based learning, and they just want you to take a look, or have some extra feedback or ways to improve their lesson before they actually implement it. And a bonus tip that goes along with this one is just share your lesson plans, maybe mentioned to your colleagues that this is a lesson that you were that you use, that worked really well. And you were happy to have implemented it and why it worked. So just share some of the lessons that you’ve done.

And the last tip that we’re going to talk about, and I think this is the most important tip is a huge, huge eye opener for a lot of people, including myself, I still still learn a lot by doing this is playing games outside of the classroom. So even even with all the lessons I’ve used for game based learning, I’m always playing other games and learning other learning about other game mechanics and other ways that maybe I can change or manipulate this game mechanic for a learning environment. And this is again, number one tip, play some games outside of the classroom also helps spread the idea of using games in the classroom. So you can do maybe a happy hour night or you’re playing games and then at the end, you can casually drop in the phrase, this would be great as a lesson What do you think and then you kind of spark that conversation with your fellow colleagues about the idea of using this game and modifying it for a learning environment. You can also host a family game night at your school to help introduce students and teachers to the concept of modern board game hobby. So I think if you’re familiar with board games, you’re familiar with newer board games, modern board games, you know that they are very different than 1015 years ago, 2030 years ago, very different than monopoly very different than clue. They’re expanding on a lot of different game mechanics and different concepts in board games. And you might be familiar with the idea that there’s a board game about everything. There’s a board game about airplanes, and airline companies, there’s a board game about managing restaurants, there’s a board game about the human cell, there’s a board game about

ions and compounds. So there’s, there’s board games, about everything, just everything that you can imagine, maybe there might be a few things maybe they haven’t designed board games about. But the The point is that there are so many games out there. And so many different mechanics and so many different ways to use games, there’s going to be games out there that that are that people enjoy. You might come across people that say, Oh, I don’t really like games, well, maybe they just haven’t had an opportunity to find a board game they do enjoy. So playing games, host family game nights host a board game club, invite your fellow colleagues to join on, you’re maybe on a board game club, you’re running with your students, you can ask your colleagues to come drop by for a game or two. There’s games that last 15 minutes, let them know, Hey, this game only lasts 15 minutes, come check it out tonight, or come play at iron game club after school today. And who knows, they’ll probably stick around for more than just a 15 minute game, they might play a couple more because they enjoy it. So that is the last tip and the most important is to play games outside of the classroom. Alright, so those are the four tips that I have for you to help encourage your colleagues to use more games or more board games in the classroom, lead by example. So play some games in your classroom already. The words gonna get out that you’ve been doing it, students are going to go from your class to fellow colleagues class and talk about the game they played in your class, give a professional development share some of the things that you’ve done, you don’t, you don’t need to have the way to do it, you can just share some ways that you’ve done it and some ways that you’ve been successful in implementing it. Go on to the blog posts that I have, here are some resources that you can use for that professional development that show how research backs up this idea of game based learning how it encourages engagement builds relationships in your classroom, help your fellow colleagues plan their lesson, help them come up with some ideas for game based learning, contribute even a little bit. Let them know that you’ve done these things. And they could try and doing a different game based learning lesson. search Google maybe there’s already game based learning lesson out there for an idea that a teacher is looking for. share that with them. And then the last one is playing games, play a lot of games outside of the classroom, play a game during happy hour and then drop the line. Would this make a great lesson? What do you think? So that’s it for this week’s episode. Again, as always, thank you for tuning in. If you have any questions for me or want to reach out to me, you can email me podcasts at Board Gaming with education.com. We also love to hear from you. I am always going live on Instagram on Fridays, you can watch the replay of that video. It’s a behind the scenes look at what’s going on with Board Gaming with Education, travel comment. I’m always wondering what games you’re playing on there too. And it’s really great to see what games people are playing in the Board Gaming with Education community. So again, thank you again, happy new year and we will be back next week.

Board Gaming with Education 13:51
Thank you for listening in this week. If you liked what you heard, be sure to let us know you can find us on social media as Board Gaming with Education or big games or email us at podcast at Board Gaming with education.com. If you want to support our podcast Be sure to check out our support page on our website. As always teach better learn more and most importantly, play more. Thank you for listening and until next time

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